Embedded Support to Seamless Counseling to Graduation
Sep
29
9:00 am09:00

Embedded Support to Seamless Counseling to Graduation

  • Albertus Magnus College

Keynote address and workshop by Prof. Peter Arthur, University of British Columbia at Okanagan, “Meta Cognition, Grit and Growth Mindset as keys to retention.”  Professor Arthur’s research includes evidence-based strategies faculty may embed in their learning environments. 

Additional details later this spring. Time may be subject to change.

SAVE THE DATE!

Our City as a College Town
Nov
17
9:00 am09:00

Our City as a College Town

  • University of Connecticut

Modeled on Hartford’s new energy re: higher education with UConn moving downtown; lessons from and for other cities in Connecticut and New England.

Additional details later this spring. Time may be subject to change.

SAVE THE DATE!

 


Embedded Support: How It Helps, Why It Works
Apr
13
9:00 am09:00

Embedded Support: How It Helps, Why It Works

  • Eastern Connecticut State University

Some colleges around the nation have embedded remedial education in conventional, credit-bearing classes, and done so with successfulresults in selected courses, generally assisted by grants. But no state has reduced the time entering students can be in remedial education while addressing their gaps in the way Connecticut has.

Connecticut’s law—and its implementation—has drawn national attention because of its novel approach to dealing with what is widely seen as a primary obstacle to improving graduation rates.

Hear first-hand from those who’ve made the transition—faculty, students and administrators—explain how embedded support helps, why it works, and what the experience has been.

Is embedded support a critical component for extending student success?

Online Registration
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/embedded-support-how-it-helps-why-it-works-tickets-27578205154

Building Partnerships for Recruiting, Retention & Resourcing College Programs for Underrepresented, First Generation, and Adult Education Students
Jan
13
1:00 pm13:00

Building Partnerships for Recruiting, Retention & Resourcing College Programs for Underrepresented, First Generation, and Adult Education Students

  • Goodwin College

At this session, we will work together to develop:

  • Concrete strategies for recruiting underrepresented, first generation and other challenged students in higher education – both traditional age students and adult learners;
  • Collaborative proposals for implementation across campuses to support the success and retention of these students;
  • Creative approaches to provide resources for these programs in a time of limited funds and supports; and
  • Ideas and suggestions for “Part II” conference on “Embedded Support,” April 13, 2017, 9 am – 3 pm - at ECSU in Willimantic.

There is no charge for this session.

To email your plans to attend, or for more information, contact David Johnston at educationRwe@gmail.com or Alan Kramer at akramer@goodwin.edu

Snow date is Jan. 20. 

The New Adult Education: Key to Overdue Opportunity and a Dynamic Workforce?
Oct
5
9:00 am09:00

The New Adult Education: Key to Overdue Opportunity and a Dynamic Workforce?

  • Middlesex Community College

While adult education has been around for many years, the nature and quality has varied widely, depending on the type  of community, whether any given school system sees adulted as a positive or negative part of its K-12 system,  and  more.  Recently, more people in Connecticut (and perhaps elsewhere) see the potential for adult ed, in partnership with higher education, to help many people who have struggled educationally to:

  • Improve their lives through pursuit of postsecondary education, often for the first time;
  • Help address shortages of specific skills in the economy,
  • Recognize the need for college credentials, of various types, to address these shortages; and,
  • Be one answer to declining college enrollments (especially at community colleges and state universities),

Connecticut is now embarked on an ambitious program of adult education. This conference will look at the rationale for these programs, and dig into the critical but thorny imperative to track the results of these programs over time.

To register and pay on-line with a credit card, please click the link below:

Registration Now Open

Saving Higher Education
Apr
29
9:00 am09:00

Saving Higher Education

  • Goodwin College

How to Save Higher Education:
Conference Continues on Apr. 29

The Center for Higher Education Retention Excellence (CHERE) is sponsoring an innovative two-part conference on “Saving Higher Education.”  The first session was held on Nov. 13; the conclusion will be on April 29, 2016.  It is a two-part program to foster continuity and longer-term impact. Participants in Day 1 came away with tangible program ideas from some very good campus initiatives.  They will return in April to talk about implementation plans and actions.

Part 1: November 13 at Central Connecticut State University - Can Non-Traditional Students Save Higher Education, and Vice Versa?, to explore issues related to non-traditional students including underrepresented and first generation traditional age students and adult learners who have never been to college.  

Guest Speaker:  Jennifer Smith, Ph.D., University of Texas – Austin. Dr. Smith is  Director of the University Leadership Network, a nationally-recognized incentive-based scholarship program with a focus on leadership, professional development, and experiential learning.  The program serves students who may meet all or a combination of: high financial need, rural background, first generation, and underrepresented student populations.

CHERE April 29 2016 Flyer Registration Form

Part 2: April 29 at Goodwin College – Saving Higher Ed: Identifying Solutions That Really Work

Guest Speaker:  George Mehaffy, Vice President for Academic Leadership and Change, American Association of State Colleges and Universities.  His division of AASCU is responsible for developing and managing programs for member institutions in areas such as organizational change, civic engagement, leadership development, undergraduate education, technology, international education and teacher education.  He works closely with university presidents and chief academic officers on a variety of national initiatives. Before coming to AASCU, he had more than twenty years of teaching and administrative experience in higher education in Texas, New Mexico, and California.

This two-day, two-part  conference looks at promising and best practices on both sides of the higher education continuum, access (“getting in”) and success (retaining to graduation and employment), through the eyes of public and private school educators, community-based organizations, and students themselves.

The November conference also included an expert panel that will include the Provost of CCSU, two institution presidents (from a Connecticut Community College and a private university), a senior elected official from the state legislature and a representative of the Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education.

Among the key questions of the day: How do we change that perception in an era of rapidly increasing costs of higher education?  How do we make sure that those who advise high school students — parents, counselors, teachers, community agency staff — understand the quality of career and technical education programs and see them as viable choices?

Nov. 13/April 29 Conference Sponsors:  The conference is sponsored by CHERE in partnership with the Hartford Consortium for Higher Education, the Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education, Central Connecticut State University, Goodwin College and the National Resource Center for First Year Experience and Students in Transition at the University of South Carolina.

“Most middle- and low-income students struggle to complete a degree…but a big part of the solution lies at schools like the University of Texas at Austin, selective but not super-elite, that are able to take large numbers of highly motivated working-class students and give them the tools they need to become successful professionals.  The U.T. experiment reminds us that the process isn’t easy; it never has been.   But it also reminds us that it is possible.”  –  New York Times Magazine (2014)

Autism Conference
Apr
1
9:00 am09:00

Autism Conference

  • University of Saint Joseph

Higher Education & Students with Autism:  What We Know, What We Need to Know & How We Get There Together.  A half-day conference for college and university faculty and staff to learn about strategies for improving the success of college students with Autism.

Friday, April 1, 2016, 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM at University of Saint Joseph in West Hartford.

Keynote Presentation by Jane Thierfeld Brown, Director of Student Services, UConn School of Law.

Includes Student/Parent Response Panel, Universal Design Panel: Evidence-Based Practices and Implementing Universal Design:  Interactive Session & Expert Panel.

Free of charge.  Registration required.  

Presented by CHERE, the Hartford Consortium for Higher Education, University of Saint Joseph.  With support from Aetna.

A copy of “Students with Asperger Syndrome: A Guide for College Personnel” will be included in conference materials.

Can Non-Traditional Students Save Higher Education and Vice Versa?
Nov
13
Nov 14

Can Non-Traditional Students Save Higher Education and Vice Versa?

  • Central Connecticut State University

The Center for Higher Education Retention Excellence (CHERE) is sponsoring a two-day conference, Can Non-Traditional Students Save Higher Education, and Vice Versa?, to explore issues related to non-traditional students including underrepresented, and first generation traditional age students and adult learners who have never been to college.  The event will be held on Friday, November 13 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, November 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Central Connecticut State University in New Britain.

This two-day conference will look at promising and best practices on both sides of the higher education continuum, access (“getting in”) and success (retaining to graduation and employment), through the eyes of public and private school educators, community-based organizations, and students themselves.

The conference is sponsored by CHERE in partnership with the Hartford Consortium for Higher Education, the Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education, Central Connecticut State University, and the National Resource Center for First Year Experience and Students in Transition at the University of South Carolina.

The keynote speakers from the University of Texas – Austin will outline the innovative, evidence-based approach that was featured in the New York Times Magazine in 2014, which concluded:

“Most middle- and low-income students struggle to complete a degree…but a big part of the solution lies at schools like the University of Texas at Austin, selective but not super-elite, that are able to take large numbers of highly motivated working-class students and give them the tools they need to become successful professionals.  The U.T. experiment reminds us that the process isn’t easy; it never has been.   But it also reminds us that it is possible.”

While the conference invitation asks for workshop proposal submissions, it is expected that the topics covered will include themes like bridge programs, college readiness, quality access work, seamless counseling, retention/persistence, first-generation students, career and technical education, adult learners, escalating costs, adult learners, public policy issues, and more.

The conference plenary session will include an expert panel that will include the Provost of CCSU, two institution presidents (from a Connecticut Community College and a private university), a senior elected official from the state legislature and a representative of the Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education.

Register NOW and save!  Friday, Nov. 13 (9:00-4;00) and Saturday, Nov. 14, (9:00 – 1:00).
REGISTRATION FORM

Among the key questions of the day: How do we change that perception in an era of rapidly increasing costs of higher education?  How do we make sure that those who advise high school students — parents, counselors, teachers, community agency staff — understand the quality of career and technical education programs and see them as viable choices?

FEES

Conference Fee: $195

Discounted Fees for early registration/multiple registrations from same institution:

PRIOR TO SEPT. 151st registration: $175   2nd registration: $150   additional: $150

AFTER SEPT. 151st registration: $195   2nd registration: $175   additional: $150

Scholarships: Funding may be available for a limited number of scholarships, pending individual financial circumstances

Call Ruby Blackmon at 860.558.8528.  Calls will be returned promptly.

DEADLINE TO SUBMIT WORKSHOP PROPOSALS:  September 30   

Community Colleges: Their Time Has Come
Apr
24
9:00 am09:00

Community Colleges: Their Time Has Come

  • Tunxis Community College

Program included:

  • Research-based perspective from a Senior Researcher at the Community College Research Center at Columbia University
  • Overview from several Community College leaders in Connecticut
  •  Insights on Community College experience from several students
  • Best practices at Rockland (NY) Community College by veteran educators

The conference featured nationally acclaimed education researcher, Dr. Elisabeth Barnett from the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, New York.  Panelists will include President Cathryn Addy from Tunxis Community College, President Ann Wasescha from Middlesex Community College, a veteran college instructor, and a veteran high school counselor.

Technical and Career Education: An Important Part of the Higher Ed Continuum
Nov
21
9:00 am09:00

Technical and Career Education: An Important Part of the Higher Ed Continuum

  • Housatonic Community College

How to have one and two-year programs, including exciting new options at community colleges, be a part of higher education alternatives for more high school graduates. How best to serve motivated students through programs that attract many challenged and under-represented students, including adult learners, but with widely disparate outcomes in retention, graduation, and ultimate debt levels in relation to ability to pay off those debts. CHERE expresses appreciation to the Travelers Foundation for generous support.

Bridge Programs: From Here to There
Sep
26
9:00 am09:00

Bridge Programs: From Here to There

  • Western Connecticut State University

“Summer before,” high-school “catch-up” and “reach-back” programs to help challenged high school students and “adult learners” see higher education as an option and overcome deficits that compromise their readiness for college.  Campus and community programs in Connecticut and a “best practices” program from LaGuardia Community College in Queens, New York were featured, and a student panel talked about their experience.

Seamless Counseling
May
14
9:00 am09:00

Seamless Counseling

  • U.S. Coast Guard Academy

Featuring a panel of five community-based agencies helping challenged students access and succeed in higher education.  Students from each program talked about their experiences.

Immigrants and Higher Education
Feb
25
10:30 pm22:30

Immigrants and Higher Education

  • Hartford Foundation for Public Giving

Featuring keynote speaker Carolina Borteletto, Founder of CT Students for a Dream, created to help undocumented students access higher education.

Retention to Postsecondary Graduation
Sep
28
10:30 pm22:30

Retention to Postsecondary Graduation

  • Goodwin College

In September 2012, a diverse Planning Committee composed of higher education officials, advocates and students, used a Casey Foundation grant to sponsor, “Retention to Postsecondary Graduation”, at Goodwin College — attended by 120 representatives of Connecticut colleges, and other from throughout New England.  Attendees heard a panel of students talk about their retention challenges, and heard descriptions of several cutting-edge programs in Connecticut and one from Boston.